(via nobledrewali)

"It is often said that baseball blew up in America in the age of radio, and the N.F.L. rose to dominance once television took over. Soccer is the perfect sport for the Internet era. American fans can follow games and instantaneously track information from global leagues both big and small, feeling as close to their favorite teams as if they lived within a thrown beer of their stadium."

- Roger Bennett (via azspot)

(via girlwithalessonplan)

beyonce:

Dallas, Texas December 2013
Photographed by Robin Harper 

I don’t think y’all understand my affinity for Beyoncé…

beyonce:

Dallas, Texas December 2013

Photographed by Robin Harper 

I don’t think y’all understand my affinity for Beyoncé…

(via fuckyesbeyonce)

(via centraltrack)

nyctophxilia:

I like my women curvy. lots and lots of curves. so many curves. maybe even a spiral shape. with ketchup. my ideal woman is actually curly fry.

(via wifi-shawty)

Look at what I found out in the Texas suburbs.

Look at what I found out in the Texas suburbs.

Tagged with:

rare

"Everything we feared about communism - that we would lose our houses and savings and be forced to labor eternally for meager wages with no voice in the system - has come true under capitalism."

- Jeff Sparrow (via sinidentidades)

(via disciplesofmalcolm)

(via sophiasez)

galaaxyy:

Dallas babyyy

galaaxyy:

Dallas babyyy

(via centraltrack)

theatlantic:

A Bullseye In the Sky Over Texas

When we see patterns in the atmosphere from space, they tend to be in the clouds of powerful storms. These all have roughly the same form: they look like a spiral galaxy with arms spinning out from the core. 
But meteorologists have detected other organizational principles at work. Like, take the fascinating image above. It shows …. well, I wasn’t sure exactly what it showed. A meteorologist’s blog post described them as “convectively-generated mesospheric airglow waves,” but that did not quite explain how they worked or what they were.
So I got in touch with Steven Miller, senior research scientist and deputy director of the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) at Colorado State University. Miller and his colleagues discovered these concentric rings while working with the newish satellite Suomi satellite’s next-generation low-light sensor. (They published a paper on the discovery in PNAS.)
Miller told me I was looking at glowing ripples in the atmosphere itself!
“These are literally ‘ripples of glowing atmosphere’ whose structure is the result of a train of gravity waves that is passing through a thin layer of the atmosphere that produces a very faint veil of light called ‘nightglow,’” he said. “These are not clouds (although they were forced by the thunderstorms below), and they do not occur in the troposphere, where our ‘weather’ is. They are much higher up—at the interface between the mesosphere and the thermosphere—about 90 km [55 miles] above the surface! The glow is revealing important dynamics of our atmosphere that would otherwise be completely invisible to us.”
Read more. [Image: Suomi]

theatlantic:

A Bullseye In the Sky Over Texas

When we see patterns in the atmosphere from space, they tend to be in the clouds of powerful storms. These all have roughly the same form: they look like a spiral galaxy with arms spinning out from the core. 

But meteorologists have detected other organizational principles at work. Like, take the fascinating image above. It shows …. well, I wasn’t sure exactly what it showed. A meteorologist’s blog post described them as “convectively-generated mesospheric airglow waves,” but that did not quite explain how they worked or what they were.

So I got in touch with Steven Miller, senior research scientist and deputy director of the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) at Colorado State University. Miller and his colleagues discovered these concentric rings while working with the newish satellite Suomi satellite’s next-generation low-light sensor. (They published a paper on the discovery in PNAS.)

Miller told me I was looking at glowing ripples in the atmosphere itself!

These are literally ‘ripples of glowing atmosphere’ whose structure is the result of a train of gravity waves that is passing through a thin layer of the atmosphere that produces a very faint veil of light called ‘nightglow,’” he said. “These are not clouds (although they were forced by the thunderstorms below), and they do not occur in the troposphere, where our ‘weather’ is. They are much higher up—at the interface between the mesosphere and the thermosphere—about 90 km [55 miles] above the surface! The glow is revealing important dynamics of our atmosphere that would otherwise be completely invisible to us.”

Read more. [Image: Suomi]

nohighs:

can you imagine Future playing a packed out stadium then right as he’s singing Honest and says “name one nigga hotter” the entire stadium screams “Kanye West!!” in unison

(via shakediezel)

xavieretillweoverdose:

What I need right now

xavieretillweoverdose:

What I need right now


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